“Playing RPG Maker”? Amateur Game Design and Video Gaming


Hurel Pierre-Yves
2016 DiGRA/FDG '16 - Proceedings of the First International Joint Conference of DiGRA and FDG

Game creation tools like Game Maker or RPG Maker democratize game making and facilitate the development of amateur game design. The best known among these programs have dynamic web-communities with active members making thousands of games. However, as of now, there is little research on amateur game design except for modding or education fields. In this paper I argue that approaching amateur game making in these relations with video game playing allows a better understanding of game creation tools’ users. To support my argument, I will lean on the early results of the exploratory step of my ongoing research.

 

Ethnographic Fieldwork in the Study of Game Production


Garner Gabrielle
2014 DiGRA '13 - Proceedings of the 2013 DiGRA International Conference: DeFragging Game Studies

The purpose of this essay is to show the ways in which ethnographic methodology provided a useful means for investigating the work and activity of an emergent game production team and system. With neither expertise in game design nor software programming, the researcher gained access to the unit of analysis, the production of educational computer games, as a research and instructional design apprentice. The essay shares an experience of sociological inquiry in the context of a highly complex and private game production process.

 

Play as Transgression: An Ethnographic Approach to Queer Game Cultures


Sundén Jenny
2009 DiGRA '09 - Proceedings of the 2009 DiGRA International Conference: Breaking New Ground: Innovation in Games, Play, Practice and Theory

This paper is based on an ongoing ethnography of a GLBT (gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender) guild in the MMOG World of Warcraft. Drawing on queer/feminist theory, the argument concentrates on sexuality as resource for ‘transgressive play’. The notion of transgressive play is usually taken to mean play against the ‘ideal’ or ‘implied’ player of the game, of playing the game in ways not anticipated by design. For queer gamers, sexuality comes into play in ways that make visible the cultural norms of the ideal player – a player who is at least symbolically male and straight. This ethnographic work indicates that there are queer uses of game spaces that in significant ways make visible – and play around with – norms and expectations that are shaping what online game communities are, and what they could be.

 

Gender in Play: Mapping a Girls’ Gaming Club


Taylor Nicholas Jenson Jennifer de Castell Suzanne
2007 DiGRA '07 - Proceedings of the 2007 DiGRA International Conference: Situated Play

To better understand boys’ privilege and girls’ educational disadvantage with regard to video games, this presentation aims to challenge the ways girl gamers are rendered invisible by gaming communities, researchers, and designers. Drawing from audiovisual research of a girls’ gaming club at an elementary school in Toronto, this paper explores the micro-interactions of a gaming session between five girls which is interrupted when two boys enter the scene and try to hijack their play. Using the MAP (Multimodal Application Program, developed by Suzanne de Castell and Jennifer Jenson) tool to visually chart and analyze the co-ordinated reactions of the girls as they put down their controllers and hold their bodies immobile during the boys’ disruption, this paper explores the tenuous relationship to video games these girls enjoy, even within a space ostensibly devoted to their play.

 

Video games in context: An ethnographic study of situated meaning-making practices of Asian immigrant adolescents in New York City


Hung Chia-Yuan
2007 DiGRA '07 - Proceedings of the 2007 DiGRA International Conference: Situated Play

Many studies of players have described how situated learning occurs in video games. However, the “situated” nature of video games is complicated because players exist not only as player-avatars in a virtual world, but also as a player-human in a physical setting. This paper is based on an ethnographic study of a group of Asian adolescents in New York City, who play video games in various settings, such as Internet cafés and at home. Being recent immigrants from China and English language learners, playing video games requires that they understand the action occurring in the game without necessarily having access to the language. The study looks at how the real-world conditions shape their meaning-making practices as situated within particular physical spaces and suggests that researchers need to look beyond the actions of the player-avatar and consider the actions of the player-human as well, because how they make sense of video games may be contingent upon the real-world conditions unfolding around them.

 

Video games in context: An ethnographic study of situated


Chia Yuan Hung
2007 DiGRA '07 - Proceedings of the 2007 DiGRA International Conference: Situated Play

Many studies of players have described how situated learning occurs in video games. However, the “situated” nature of video games is complicated because players exist not only as player-avatars in a virtual world, but also as a player-human in a physical setting. This paper is based on an ethnographic study of a group of Asian adolescents in New York City, who play video games in various settings, such as Internet cafés and at home. Being recent immigrants from China and English language learners, playing video games requires that they understand the action occurring in the game without necessarily having access to the language. The study looks at how the real-world conditions shape their meaning-making practices as situated within particular physical spaces and suggests that researchers need to look beyond the actions of the player-avatar and consider the actions of the player-human as well, because how they make sense of video games may be contingent upon the real-world conditions unfolding around them.

 

Video games in context: An ethnographic study of situated


Hung Chia-Yuan
2007 DiGRA '07 - Proceedings of the 2007 DiGRA International Conference: Situated Play

Many studies of players have described how situated learning occurs in video games. However, the “situated” nature of video games is complicated because players exist not only as player-avatars in a virtual world, but also as a player-human in a physical setting. This paper is based on an ethnographic study of a group of Asian adolescents in New York City, who play video games in various settings, such as Internet cafés and at home. Being recent immigrants from China and English language learners, playing video games requires that they understand the action occurring in the game without necessarily having access to the language. The study looks at how the real-world conditions shape their meaning-making practices as situated within particular physical spaces and suggests that researchers need to look beyond the actions of the player-avatar and consider the actions of the player-human as well, because how they make sense of video games may be contingent upon the real-world conditions unfolding around them.