CfP: FDG 2015: Call for Workshops (deadline: 12/31)

The conference workshops are full-day and half-day sessions focused on emerging game-related topics. These workshops provide an informal setting for new developments to be presented, discussed and demonstrated. Workshops can also be hands-on or studio-based, and we especially encourage the submission of proposals for workshops that involve participants working together to explore and define new areas of game-related scholarship.
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CfP: Chapters for “Video Games and Religion: Methods and Approaches”

Video games pervade much of society regardless of age or gender and
open new forms of representation, entangling narrative, audiovisuals,
spatiality, game mechanics and code into dynamic and interactive
cultural artifacts. Video games increasingly refer to religious
mythologies and belief systems but also, video games with an
explicitly religious content appear on the market, coming from diverse
religious traditions and multifaceted backgrounds, ranging from
proselytization to education and cultural dialogue. Nevertheless, do
gamers actually apprehend and discuss these religious or religion
influenced game-immanent narratives as they play.

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CfP: CCC 2015: 6th International Conference on Computational Creativity (ICCC)

Computational Creativity is the art, science, philosophy and engineering
of computational systems which, by taking on particular
responsibilities, exhibit behaviours that unbiased observers would deem
to be creative. As a field of research, this area is thriving, with
progress in formalising what it means for software to be creative, along
with many exciting and valuable applications of creative software in the
sciences, the arts, literature, gaming and elsewhere.

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CfP: GECCO 2015: Digital Entertainment Technologies and Arts (DETA) Track

Arts, music, and games are key application fields for evolutionary computation, computational intelligence, and biologically inspired techniques. The digital entertainment technologies and arts (DETA) track invites submissions describing original work involving the use of computation in the creative arts, including design, games, and music. In all accepted work there must be some connection to evolutionary computation, computational intelligence, or biologically inspired algorithms.
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CfP: The Building Blocks of Life: A Minecraft Colloquium (Concordia University, Canada)

This one-day colloquium is geared towards graduate and undergraduate students currently researching the video game Minecraft (Mojang, 2009). Minecraft has attracted a huge and diverse audience on account of its open-ended format, multiple play styles, creative possibilities, and even its practical uses in education and architectural planning. It has proven to be an extremely rich source of scholarly engagement, and its possibilities for research are only in the first stages. This colloquium seeks to bring together ideas for papers, presentations and panels as diverse as the possibilities within the game. We invite proposals from a range of disciplines and perspectives, including game studies, research/creation, fine arts, education and pedagogy, computer science, and digital humanities, and encourage submissions that approach the game from uncommon and unexpected angles.

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CfP: GAS 2015, Games and Software Engineering workshop

The 2015 Games and Software Engineering workshop (GAS 2015) explores issues that crosscut the software engineering and the game engineering communities. Modern games entail the development, integration, and balancing of software capabilities drawn from algorithm design and complexity, artificial intelligence, computer graphics, computer-supported cooperative work/play, database management systems, human-computer interaction and interface design, operating systems and resource/storage management, networking, programming/scripting language design and interpretation, performance monitoring, and more. Few other software system application arenas demand such technical mastery and integration skill. Yet game development is expected to rely on such mastery, and provide a game play experience that most users find satisfying, fun, and engaging. Computer games are thus an excellent domain for which to research and develop new ways and means for software engineering.
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