CfP: Different Games 2015

Different Games, the first conference on inclusivity and diversity in games, invites participants for its 2015 edition at NYU MAGNET, located in Brooklyn, NY, on Friday April 3 and Saturday April 4. After a hugely successful 2nd year that welcomed 40­ some speakers, dozens of original games and more than 300 attendees, Different Games is back for a third edition and we can’t wait to come together again this April!

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CfP: Fans, Videogames and History

Over the last two decades, a substantial amount of research has addressed the fan culture phenomenon, particularly in relation to film and television; the focus has centred on the impact that fan communities can and have had on the ‘official’ creative works that are released by film and television studios. More recently, researchers have examined the impact that the internet has played in empowering and expanding the fan network and fan communication structures, and in affecting the production, marketing and audience engagement with the fan object.

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CfP: McMaster University Graduate Conference: Protocol

The graduate students in the MA in Communication and New Media at McMaster University are pleased to invite the submission of research and artistic presentations for our inaugural graduate conference: Protocol. Protocol might refer to the intricate technical protocols that underlie contemporary electronic communications. But protocol also refers us to descriptions and prescriptions of the new media interactions of individuals, groups and larger identity structures.

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CfP: Book chapters for “Video Games in East Asia”

Contributors are sought for an interdisciplinary book on video games in East Asia to be edited by Austin Lee and Alexis Pulos and published by Palgrave Macmillan for its East Asian Popular Culture Series. The series was launched in 2014 in order to meet an increased interest in the subject among scholars of various disciplines in recent years. East Asia refers to China, Hong Kong, Japan, North Korea, South Korea, and Taiwan. Reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of popular culture studies, the series will accept submissions from different social sciences and humanities disciplines that use a variety of methods.

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Book: The Uncanny Valley in Games and Animation by A. Tinwell

Advances in technology have enabled animators and video game designers to design increasingly realistic, human-like characters in animation and games. Although it was intended that this increased realism would allow viewers to appreciate the emotional state of characters, research has shown that audiences often have a negative reaction as the human likeness of a character increases. This phenomenon, known as the Uncanny Valley, has become a benchmark for measuring if a character is believably realistic and authentically human like. This book is an essential guide on how to overcome the Uncanny Valley phenomenon when designing human-like characters in digital applications.

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